Organisation: 
University of Queensland
Other name: 
UQ
Organisation type: 
University

Projects funded

Displaying 11 - 20 of 52
Centre for Coal Seam Gas (University of Queensland)
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences (University of Queensland)
This project aims to assess the feasibility on the use of Queensland algae for beneficial application downstream of the reverse osmosis plant by performing a detailed scoping and techno-economic analysis. The analysis will provide UQ-CCSG members with robust analysis of the technical requirements and the implications for a business case and value chain. It will also result in a budget estimate for completing a high-level business case. Recent research showed that microalgae strains from Queensland readily grow in CSG water...
Centre for Coal Seam Gas (University of Queensland)
Bureau of Economic Geology (University of Texas at Austin)
There continues to be a significant level of community concern regarding the potential environmental impacts of the developing CSG industry in Australia. While large-scale CSG development is a recent phenomenon in Australia, the industry has a long term history in both Canada and the USA (where CSG is known as coal bed methane or CBM). This project will review the literature on the environmental impact of coal seam gas development in Australia, Canada and the USA. The US CBM industry...
School of Chemical Engineering (University of Queensland)
Coal is found in seams (layers) that have been deposited at different times, under different environmental conditions and subject to different geological processes. Consequently, coal is not a uniform substance, and there is a lot of variability within and between seams which can affect how easily gas and water flow through the coal. In some areas gas and water will flow easily (the coal is highly permeable), while in others the physical structure of the coal restricts gas and water...
School of Earth Sciences (University of Queensland)
The flow of fluids through coal seams within a shaly mud has proved to be more complex than reservoir engineers expected. Typically engineers make mathematical models over the CSG reservoir to forecast the flow of gas and water from the reservoir into a pattern of wells to determine the best strategy to extract the gas. These simulations require some understanding of the small-scale flow behaviour, particularly near the wells. This research project will develop a mathematical model in this near-wellbore...
School of Earth Sciences (University of Queensland)
One of the major technical challenges with coal seam gas development is the ability to predict permeability and reservoir performance in order to estimate gas production. Within coal measures there are fault and fracture systems which can compartmentalise a reservoir and make predictions of "good versus bad" fault difficult. An improved structural model of the Surat Basin will improve reservoir modelling. This project will provide such a structural framework for the Surat Basin and include details of faults and associated...
School of Chemical Engineering (University of Queensland)
Coal seam gas is extracted from the coal seams by gas wells that are drilled down to the target coal seam. The wells remove both gas and water from the coal seam, however, there are often small amounts of rock and silt that are disturbed by the gas/water flow. These fine particles can be naturally present within the coal seam or created by several different processes associated with extracting the gas, such as drilling activities or rock fracturing. These particles...
School of Chemical Engineering (University of Queensland)
Estimating wellbore pressure profiles in a coal seam gas well (CSG) is important for predicting the production rates of wells. Furthermore, estimated pressure profiles are crucial in designing artificial lift systems, that is, using artificial means to dewater CSG wells and reduce the bottom hole pressure (BHP). The available models in industry simulators were originally designed for conventional wells, where gas and liquid flow concurrently in a pipe. However, the upward flow of gas and downward flow of water in...
Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining (University of Queensland)
Successive Australian Governments have developed research policies that actively encourage industry to fund university research, something that is common throughout the world. Universities are expected to engage with industry to ensure that research programs address real challenges and contribute to innovation and growth. However, this same industry funding can also lead people to question whether the research is truly independent and free from bias. These concerns are particularly evident where the research relates to a high-profile and contentious topic such...
School of Chemical Engineering (University of Queensland)
Improving gas production from individual wells provides an economic advantage for the CSG companies. In addition, improved gas production results in increased royalties which support the provision of government services; and improved well performance may result in the need for fewer wells. The extraction of coal seam gas is controlled by a number of chemical and physical factors associated with the storage and transport of gas through the sub-surface. The rate at which gas is produced from a well depends...
School of Earth Sciences (University of Queensland)
The CSG industry uses a range of technologies to monitor factors such as gas production, pressure and water quality. One method is by drilling monitoring wells that are costly, require land access and maintenance, and only provide information at one location. This research is seeking to identify monitoring technologies that are more cost effective, provide more geographic coverage and are also less disruptive for landholders. During 2014 the research team used modelling techniques to evaluate several different non-seismic geophysical techniques...

Pages